For the Sake of Love [Calm and Bright III]

This year Silent Night turns 200 years old.  In the weeks leading to Christmas (Advent) we are using the carol to reflect on what it means to wait for Christ to come into the world.

I will remove disaster from you,

so that you will not bear reproach for it.

I will deal with all your oppressors

at that time.

And I will save the lame

and gather the outcast,

and I will change their shame into praise

and renown in all the earth.

At that time I will bring you home,

at the time when I gather you;

for I will make you renowned and praised

among all the peoples of the earth,

when I restore your fortunes

before your eyes, says the Lord.

 
-Zephaniah 3:19-20

So what are we to do?  What are we to do to prepare for Christ coming into the world?  John the Baptist tells us we prepare by loveing our neighbor, caring for one another and ceasing to participate in systems of oppression.  The crowd is grateful for this news; for things they can each do.  Are we, today, equally ready to live for the sake of love?

[Hear full sermon here]

This week, use these resources to grow in your faith, or with your family.  Scriptures and activities in bold are from DPUMC’s Advent Family Devotion.

First, Do:

On your own: Write 3 love notes to family, friends or coworkers who might need to hear some good news this holiday season.

With children:   In your manger kit, Take out the second smallest and the ball.  Paint or decorate the figure to look like a shepherd, the small balls to look like sheep, and the big ball to be a donkey or a cow.

Then, Read:

Now, Reflect:

Youth and Adults: Recall a story about a surprise.  What were you doing just before the surprise?  Why did it catch you off guard? How what feelings did you go through when you were surprised?

With Children: Ask your child(ren) to remember a time they were surprised:  Was it a good surprise? Did it make them feel mad, sad, glad or afraid?  What did they do after the surprise?

Everyone: Share how the shepherds might have felt about their surprise.  What did they do when they heard the news of Jesus?

And Pray:

Dear Lord, thank you for the good news of Jesus and that no matter what he came for us, Amen

Go Share:

Pray about who in your life might need to experience the love of Christ this Christmas.  Invite one of them to come to worship with you on Christmas Eve.

Share the Love of Christ by setting aside a portion of your Christmas budget for charities that work with children and refugees.  

Quake for Joy [Calm and Bright II]

This year Silent Night turns 200 years old.  In the weeks leading to Christmas (Advent) we are using the carol to reflect on what it means to wait for Christ to come into the world.

The voice of one crying out in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord,     make his paths straight.  Every valley shall be filled,     and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall be made straight,     and the rough ways made smooth;  and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.’”
-Luke 3:4b-6
In Advent we celebrate that God is coming into the world.  Yet, when God shows up in scripture, it almost always begins with the same words: Do not be afraid. Clearly to stand in the presence of the Lord, or even God’s messenger is awe-inspiring experience. But it should fill us, not with terror, but with Joy. The present is a season of preparation for the joy that is to come. And Joy we should proclaim, for God is coming to make all things right. [Hear full sermon here] This week, use these resources to grow in your faith, or with your family.  Scriptures and activities in bold are from DPUMC’s Advent Family Devotion.

First, Do:

On your own: Everyday this week, capture a picture of something that makes you joyful and share it with a note about why it is important With children:   In your manger kit, find the two matching middle sized figures.  Color, paint, or decorate these to look like Mary and Joseph.  Traditionally Mary is associated with blue because it signaled royalty, peace, and nature.  Joseph sometimes appears as a young man, sometimes as an old man, but always dressed simply.

Then, Read:

Now, Reflect:

Youth and Adults: Write out the story of the day you were born.  If you don’t know it, ask a family member to tell you about it.  What emotions were your parents feeling?  Who was there and how did they respond? With Children: Tell each child the story of the day they were born.  Or, if your child(ren) know the story, invite them to tell it to you. Everyone: How might Mary and Joseph have felt about Jesus coming.  How did they prepare for the baby?

And Pray:

Dear Lord, thank you for moms and dads, brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles, thank you for my family and for the family of Jesus, Amen.

Go Share:

Find a piece of art depicting Mary and Joseph and share it with your thoughts on our facebook or twitter (@dpumc) #advent Share the Joy of Christ by setting aside a portion of your Christmas budget for charities that work with children and refugees.  

Peace in the Midst of Tumult [Calm and Bright I]

This year Silent Night turns 200 years old.  In the weeks leading to Christmas (Advent) we are using the carol to reflect on what it means to wait for Christ to come into the world.

Then he told them a parable: “Look at the fig tree and all the trees; as soon as they sprout leaves you can see for yourselves and know that summer is already near. So also, when you see these things taking place, you know that the kingdom of God is near. Truly I tell you, this generation will not pass away until all things have taken place. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.
-Luke 21:29-33

Advent (the weeks leading up to Christmas) reminds us that the Kingdom of God is near; the promise of God to set the world right both has been and will be fulfilled.  Around us, we may see great strife and fearful signs in the world, but we are not shaken. The people of God possess a peace that passes understanding. A peace grounded, not in the security of the world, but in the righteousness of God. We can be peace, even in the darkest times, because we know the day of the Lord is at hand.

[Hear full sermon here]

This week, use these resources to grow in your faith, or with your family.  Scriptures and activities in bold are from DPUMC’s Advent Family Devotion.

First, Do:

On your own: Make a list of all the things that trouble you right now in the world.  As you add each item, try not to dwell on blame or anxiety, but offer it to God and ask for wisdom.

With children: Build a manger.  You can use Popsicle sticks or other materials (for DPUMC Joel has kits available).  Leave it empty for now. Over the coming weeks, you will add to the scene.

Then, Read:

Now, Reflect:

Youth and Adults: Recall a time from your childhood when you traveled to see family.  What was the journey like?  Where did you stay?   What was it like to stay in a strange place? With Children: Ask your child(ren) to remember a time they traveled:  Can you remember us spending the night somewhere else?  Where were we? What was it like to stay there? How did you feel about coming home? How might Mary and Joseph have felt in a strange city.  What do you think it was like sleeping in the stable?  Who is like Mary and Joseph today?

And Pray:

Dear Lord, Thank you for our family and our home. Thank you for this season of Advent so that we can wait for you together, amen.

Go Share:

Find a modern story that reflects Mary and Joseph’s journey and share it with your thoughts on our facebook or twitter (@dpumc) Share the peace of Christ by setting aside a portion of your Christmas budget for charities that work with children and refugees.  

Silent night, holy night/ All is calm, all is bright/ Round yon Virgin Mother and Child/ Holy Infant so tender and mild/ Sleep in heavenly peace Sleep in heavenly peace Silent Night v1